How to Win a 70-Mile Rowing Race

How to Win a 70-Mile Rowing Race

I’m not just a Doctor of Physical Therapy… I row “a little bit” in my spare time as well.

This year as “Team IMUA”, my teammate Thiago Silva and I raced and won the 2nd annual Seventy48 race in Seattle, WA. We trained for months, emphasized an enhanced training regimen including better sleep (and more of it) and better nutrition. After 10 hours and 49 minutes, we crossed the finish line 1st, beating the 110 other human powered rowing and paddling craft. Here’s how we did it…

Use RockTape to Enhance Performance

Use RockTape to Enhance Performance

You know those stretchy, brightly colored athletic tapes we’re seeing on the Olympic athletes and basketball players and the like? They’re not just for show. And I use RockTape with my athletes and physical therapy clients for a number of reasons… most importantly, less pain and better performance.

Paddlers like expert Connor Inslee (Seattle, WA) appreciate this RockTape taping strategy... 40 miles and finally a pain-free forearm for the SEVENTY48 race. Here’s how we did it:

Masters Rowers: add strength training to increase your medal count

I met up with Will Ruth from RowingStronger.com to talk about his new strength training book, Rowing Stronger (vol. 2) and why developing peak power is *critical* for the masters level rower... and it doesn't take as long in the gym as you may think:

If you’ve got the know-how and the tools to create your own strength training plan, pick up a copy of Rowing Strong (2nd ed.) here.

If you’re unsure where to start and would like a program designed specifically for you with the tools you have, contact me today to make an appointment.

Strength training is a fun, dynamic, sometimes misunderstood, and vastly underutilized resource for rowing. The goal is not to “get huge” but to make your body more durable and resilient, and ready to turn on the power in the waning strokes of the race.

Looking forward to hearing from you!

~ Greg

Two Tips to a Better, Stronger Catch

Two Tips to a Better, Stronger Catch

Tight hamstrings and tight calves are too often the culprits blamed for catch compression challenges in the rowing shell.

Yet while male and female rowers alike suffer from the common malady of tight muscles, there's an unexpected, lesser known and more complicated neighboring body structure implicated:

The ankle.

The Secret Formula That Helped Me Win My First Gold Medal ... This Year.

The Secret Formula That Helped Me Win My First Gold Medal ... This Year.

Just like you, for years I believed that a proper warmup involved taking multiple repetitions of the sport at hand - layups, practice swings, rowing strokes. Follow that with some static stretching to loosen the muscles. Stick to that prescription and there's no way I'll get injured...

The Single Key Factor to Avoiding Injury

The Single Key Factor to Avoiding Injury

Have you ever been injured and missed a race? Have you trained months for the one defining event of your athletic career, and were consistently hampered by a nagging, painful injury?

I'm an athlete, and I've been in your shoes.

It sucks.

Why Adam Kreek Seeks Failure

Why Adam Kreek Seeks Failure

In my Top-5 Tips to Winning a Gold Medal, I highlight the five key components of a winning athlete. Tip #5 - "Fail Once Per Week" - is one that Adam Kreek, a 2008 Olympic Gold Medalist with the Canadian Men's National Rowing Team, highlights from the lens of both his Olympic experience and his time capsized in the Bermuda Triangle on a rowing trip between Africa and the USA.